Make your own free website on Tripod.com

cocker.gif (10105 bytes)Ectropion

hr.gif (3429 bytes)

 

button-home.gif (1669 bytes)

button-akc standards.gif (1801 bytes)

button-awards i have won.gif (1801 bytes)

button-basic care.gif (1702 bytes)

button-books.gif (1677 bytes)

button-cocker spaniel differences.gif (1832 bytes)

button-cocker spaniel rescue groups.gif (1876 bytes)

button-did you know.gif (1750 bytes)

button-health problems.gif (1786 bytes)

button-link to us.gif (1707 bytes)

button-my award winners.gif (1804 bytes)

button-my cockers.gif (1728 bytes)

button-my favorite sites.gif (1790 bytes)

button-our poll.gif (1688 bytes)

button-recipes.gif (1689 bytes)

button-supplies and toys.gif (1805 bytes)

button-the american cocker spaniel.gif (1900 bytes)

                                                                                                    

Ectropion is used to describe a condition where the lower lids are loose, causing a drooping of the eyelid's margins. The lower lids actually turn outward. One or both eyes may be involved. It can occur in any breed, but it is inherited in American Cocker Spaniels, Saint Bernards, Mastiffs and Bloodhounds.  It is a heredity ailment.

What are the symptoms?

As the lower lid sags downward, the underlying conjunctiva is exposed. This forms a pouch or pocket, allowing pollens, grasses, dust, etc., to accumulate and rub against the sensitive conjunctiva. This is a consistent source of irritation in these dogs, leading to increased redness of the conjunctiva and occasional watering of the eye which then spills out over the lower lid and face.

What are the risks?

Many dogs live normal lives with ectropion. However, some develop repeated eye infections due to the collection of dirt, dust, etc., within the eye. Therefore, the risks are minor except in severe cases, where secondary eye infections may develop.

What is the management?

Some dogs require no treatment; however if eye irritations develop, medical attention is advisable. Mild cases can be treated with eye drops or salves to alleviate irritations and/or infections when they occur. In severe cases a surgical procedure is preferred which removes excess tissue, thereby tightening the lids and removing the abnormal pocket.

Race Foster, DVM and Marty Smith, DVM
Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.

2000 Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.
Reprinted as a courtesy and with permission from PetEducation.com (http://www.PetEducation.com)
On-line store at http://www.DrsFosterSmith.com
Free pet supply catalog: 1-800-323-4208

 

Home | The American Cocker Spaniel | AKC Standards | Cocker Spaniel Rescue Groups | Basic Care | Take Our Poll! | Win My Award |My Award Winners | Awards I Have Won | Supplies And Toys | Books | My Cockers | Health Problems | Cocker Spaniel Differences | Recipes | My Favorite Sites | Sign My Guestbook | View My Guestbook | Did You Know? | Link To Us! | Contact Us! |